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Original Research

Open Access

Gender-specific factors of typical and atypical suicidal behaviors: a secondary data analysis of the 2018 Korea Youth Risk Behavior Survey

  • Heejung Kim1
  • Eun-Mi Kim2
  • Sunyoung Park3

1Mo-Im Kim Nursing Research Institute, College of Nursing, Yonsei University, 03722 Seoul, Republic of Korea

2Research Institute of Nursing Science, College of Nursing, Pusan National University, 50612 Yangsan, Republic of Korea

3Department of Psychiatry, National Health Insurance Service Ilsan Hospital, 10444 Goyang, Republic of Korea

DOI: 10.31083/jomh.2021.094 Vol.17,Issue 4,September 2021 pp.141-150

Submitted: 31 May 2021 Accepted: 15 July 2021

Published: 30 September 2021

*Corresponding Author(s): Eun-Mi Kim E-mail: emkim@pusan.ac.kr

PDF (1.67 MB)

Abstract

Background and objective: There are limited information about factor associated with linear sequences of suicidal ideation, planning, and attempts among adolescents by gender groups, and those of out-of-linear sequences. The aims of this study was to identify factors associated with typical and atypical patterns of suicidal behaviors by comparing two gender groups of adolescents.

Material and methods: This secondary data analysis was conducted based on the 2018 Korea Youth Risk Behavior Survey (N = 65528) by using descriptive statistics and multinomial logistic regression analyses with this complex sample.

Results: A total of 12.4% of adolescents were in typical groups, and 1.6% were in atypical groups. Excessive stress and a depressed state were related to typical suicidal behaviors, while violent victimization accounted for atypical suicidal behaviors (all P values < 0.001). In spite of similar degrees and directions in both gender groups, there were some different findings between the gender groups, such as a poor level of academic achievement and stress, as well as living arrangements.

Conclusion: Our study findings provide a comprehensive understanding of the risks of typical and atypical suicidal behaviors in adolescents by considering gender differences. Psychological interventions including school violence prevention should be provided to vulnerable adolescents at risk of suicide, specifically tailored to their gender differences.

Keywords

Adolescent; Depression; Psychological stress; Suicide; Violence

Cite and Share

Heejung Kim,Eun-Mi Kim,Sunyoung Park. Gender-specific factors of typical and atypical suicidal behaviors: a secondary data analysis of the 2018 Korea Youth Risk Behavior Survey. Journal of Men's Health. 2021. 17(4);141-150.

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