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Original Research

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The moderating role of individualism/collectivism in predicting male Chinese university students' exercise behavior using the theory of planned behavior

  • Haitao Feng1,†
  • Jie Guo2
  • Li Hou3,*,†,

1Hebei University of Science and Technology, 050018 Shijiazhuang, Hebei, China

2Tangshan Normal University, 063000 Tangshan, Hebei, China

3Shandong Sport University, 250102 Jinan, Shandong, China

DOI: 10.22514/jomh.2023.066 Vol.19,Issue 8,August 2023 pp.10-21

Submitted: 29 November 2022 Accepted: 21 March 2023

Published: 30 August 2023

*Corresponding Author(s): Li Hou E-mail: houli@sdpei.edu.cn

† These authors contributed equally.

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to check the moderating role of individualism/collectivism in predicting male Chinese university students’ exercise behavior using the theory of planned behavior (TPB) model. The TPB model was validated through SEM (structure equation model), and the moderating effect of individualism and collectivism was validated through a hierarchical regression and simple slopes analysis using a sample collected from 115 male Chinese university students. The results showed that the product terms of individualism and TPB factors were not able to significantly predict exercise intention after inclusion in the regression equation, nor were the product terms of collectivism and PBC (perceived behavior control) able to do so. However, the product terms of collectivism and attitude, as well as collectivism and SN (subjective norm) were able to significantly predict exercise intention when included in the regression equation. That is, horizontal and vertical collectivism can significantly moderate TPB constructs, primarily by moderating the relationship between attitude-exercise intention and SN-exercise intention. This study found that the predictive validity of exercise attitudes on exercise intentions in TPB constructs is greater only at low levels of horizontal and vertical collectivism and low at high levels. The predictive validity of SN is greater at high levels of horizontal and vertical collectivism and low in the inverse case. This research serves to enrich the theoretical framework for the theory of planned behavior and provides useful information for understanding university students’ exercise intentions and behaviors.


Keywords

Male Chinese university students; Theory of planned behavior (TPB); Exercise behavior; Individualism/collectivism


Cite and Share

Haitao Feng,Jie Guo,Li Hou. The moderating role of individualism/collectivism in predicting male Chinese university students' exercise behavior using the theory of planned behavior. Journal of Men's Health. 2023. 19(8);10-21.

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