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Effects of interval and sprint training under hypobaric hypoxia on aerobic, anaerobic, and time trial performance in elite Korean national male mountain bike cyclists—a pilot study

  • Saerom Seo1
  • Sung-Woo Kim1,2
  • Jisoo Seo1
  • Yerin Sun1
  • Jae-Ho Choi1
  • Hwanyeol Lee3
  • Hun-Young Park1,2,*,

1Department of Sports Medicine and Science, Graduate School, Konkuk University, 05029 Seoul, Republic of Korea

2Physical Activity and Performance Institute, Konkuk University, 05029 Seoul, Republic of Korea

3Department of Physical Education, Graduate School, Kyung Hee University (Global campus), 17014 Yongin-si, Republic of Korea

DOI: 10.22514/jomh.2024.047 Vol.20,Issue 3,March 2024 pp.130-138

Submitted: 09 November 2023 Accepted: 04 December 2023

Published: 30 March 2024

*Corresponding Author(s): Hun-Young Park E-mail: parkhy1980@konkuk.ac.kr

Abstract

The purpose of our study to determine the effects of interval hypoxic training (IHT) and repeated sprint training in hypoxia (RSH) on metabolic and cardiac function during submaximal exercise, aerobic and anaerobic performance, and time trial performance in elite Korean national male mountain bike (MTB) cyclists. The participants included elite Korean national male MTB cyclists (n = 4) preparing for the 19th Asian Games in Hangzhou 2022. The hypoxic training frequency was 90 min (3 days per week for 4 weeks). Before and after hypoxic training, metabolic and cardiac functions during submaximal exercise, aerobic performance, anaerobic performance and time trial performance were measured. Oxygen uptake, carbon dioxide excretion, and heart rate tended to decrease, and stroke volume, end-diastolic volume and cardiac output tended to increase. In aerobic, anaerobic and time trial performances, the peak torque in aerobic performance significantly increased (p = 0.046). Maximal oxygen uptake and exercise time in aerobic performance, relative peak power, relative mean power, post-exercise blood lactate level, fatigue index in anaerobic performance, and time trial performance showed an improved tendency (all p = 0.068). Our pilot study confirmed that although the sample size was small, IHT and RSH can potentially improve athletic performance in elite Korean national male MTB cyclists.


Keywords

Athletic performance; Hemodynamic function; Interval hypoxic training; Mountain bike cyclists; Repeated sprint training in hypoxia


Cite and Share

Saerom Seo,Sung-Woo Kim,Jisoo Seo,Yerin Sun,Jae-Ho Choi,Hwanyeol Lee,Hun-Young Park. Effects of interval and sprint training under hypobaric hypoxia on aerobic, anaerobic, and time trial performance in elite Korean national male mountain bike cyclists—a pilot study. Journal of Men's Health. 2024. 20(3);130-138.

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